How do you help the entire practice deliver better care? – GetMedi

Internal Team at Mediscripts | Fall 2015 - Summer 2016

Client: Mediscripts

Client Brief

Mediscripts, a supplier of prescription pads discovered they needed to diversify their product offering as advances in technology and industry regulations were changing the nature of business. The industry was moving to an increasing reliance on eprescribing and EMR’s , and Mediscripts current product was quickly becoming obsolete. To support itself and sister company MediPromotions, new product opportunities needed to be discovered and developed.

Research Considerations

  • What are the challenges doctors face on a day to day basis?
  • What is the doctor-software relationship currently like?
  • Who are the different people who help deliver care?
  • What are the base expectations for new tech in the office?
  • What are the barriers to adoption for new services?
  • What can we learn from seeing our product being used?

Existing Conditions

Mediscripts had their existing prescription pads SecureRx, and e-prescribing app Smart-erx. Some partnerships had already been established centered around Pharmacogenomic testing and building out solutions for those kinds of tests.

Process

Using our existing relationships with doctors and having discovered an unmet need in the relationships between physicians offices and genetic testing, we set out to discover what other unmet needs there were and what we could do to help the delivery of care be smoother, faster and simpler.

We dove into direct user research and observation. We visited doctors offices, spoke to office managers, nurses, and doctors. We conducted surveys, performed user tests, and prototyped various service ideas. We spread our research out to include doctors who were already our customers and those who did not know who we were.

We created storyboards for our new value propositions, low-fidelity mockups and live digital environments in order to prototype, refine and prototype again with our customers.

Once we had a product more or less figured out we launched in beta and partnered with 8 physician offices who would use our software, provide constant feedback and help us refine our software and user experience in real time.

Results

Key Takeaways

  • Regardless of how capable the team is, if leadership is too busy playing politics then no real change can be possible.
  • Companies that are focused on making quick money won’t really discover real product opportunity except by accident.
  • Despite physicians wanting to deliver better care, they are too constrained with the business aspect of healthcare.
  • Doctors and their staff already expect insurance complications, so they all adopt strategies off of those expectations.
  • Language used is very important, when trying to learn something. It’s very easy to jump to a wrong conclusion simply because you couldn’t find the right words to explain what you need.
  • The office manager is critical to the doctor’s ability to deliver care.
  • You can’t expect a great product user experience if the people building the product have no real experience designing products.
  • People focus on the smallest details even with the larger picture isn’t figured out because it allows them to feel like they have control of the situation.
  • Without executive buy-in for research, at the end plans and development will still follow what they say regardless of research findings.